The Candy Store Museum (“Konfektnaya Lavka”) – Private Museums of Russia

The Candy Store Museum (“Konfektnaya Lavka”)




Moscow

Contact information

Moscow, Merzlyakovskii pereulok, 15, bld. 3

Tel.: +7 (925) 857-70-35

E-mail: rus.desert@mail.ru

konfektlavka.com

Instagram: konfekt_lavka

Operating hours

10:00 – 19:00 daily

Ticket price

Adult ticket (from 12 years old) – 500 rubles

Child ticket (under 12 years old) – 400 rubles

Workshop – from 500 rubles

Owner and director of the museum

Anna Mikhailovna Semkina

Founded

2016

About museum

The Candy Store Museum “Konfektnaya Lavka” is located in a very interesting block, where the shops of court cooks and suppliers of the imperial court were located in the 18th century. One of the first suppliers of the imperial court was Aleksei Abrikosov, a famous Russian candy maker.

Following in the footsteps of the history of candy craftsmanship, we decided to recreate the “Konfektnaya Lavka” of the Russian provincial town of the late 19th century.

How did medicine turn into a sweet treat and what is hidden behind the unusual word “Konfekt”? The museum collection will tell you this.

Here guests can visit a small library containing old recipes of “konfekts” (candies), as well as learn several ways of preparing treats at workshops that we hold every day.

In our museum you will find historical and culinary data on the candy craft in Russia in the 19th century, starting with the production and sale of sugar candies and the production of candies on an industrial basis, and you will learn about the life and work of local candy makers S. and A. Abrikosov, the Leonov merchants, D.K. Kromsky, and the Voronezh factory “Ramona”, as well as the work of foreign companies and families A. Siu, F.K. Einem, J. Bormann, M. Conradi, P. Yani, and many others who found not only a new homeland in Russia, but also opportunities to apply their talents.

The basis of the museum’s exhibition is authentic packaging items, dishes, various scales and steelyards, interior decorations, clothes, photographs, booklets, and a collection of “konfektionary” wrappers (have you already guessed that these are candy wrappers?) from the late 19th – early 20th centuries.

One of the sections is devoted to the history of coffee – we describe everything about the processing, fermentation, and preparation of your favorite drink and, of course, we will set up a tasting of tea, coffee, and “konfekt” – this is precisely what makes our museum special.